Title Image

The History of the valley

The municipality of Navès has been inhabited since ancient times. You can follow traces since prehistoric, iberian times and lately they have also begun studying remains of roman times.

La Vall d’Ora belonged to the county of Urgell since the 8th century

This county was extended to what now is Andorra, part of the Alt Urgell and the Solsonès, a great sector of la Noguera, Pallars Jussà, Segarra and Bages. From 1150, and due to a marriage, became part of, first, the viscounty, after the county and later the duchy of Cardona, being framed, already in the 15th century, in the region of Castelló.

The ecclesiastical administration of the valley belonged equally to the old bishopric of Urgell and the deanship of La Vall de Lord, in the parish of Sant Andreu de la Móra, suffragan of Santa Eulàlia de la Vall. From 1592, however, they went on to belong to the new bishopric of Solsona, which was created in that period

Studies of La Vall d’Ora in medieval times start from two documents refering the monastery of Sant Pere de Graudescales, where some of the places of the valley are detailed and where the mills are already mentioned, without being specific on which ones:

  • The consecration of the church of Sant Pere de Graudescales, carried out by the bishop Nantigís of La Seu d’Urgell. It was signed on the 3rd Desember 913.
  • The fundation of the monastery of Sant Pere de Graudescales, signed on the 6th November 960.

In fact, there were up to eight mills, some of which, as it has already been seen, go back to the 10th century.

The progress that the use of the hydraulic energy had meant in the grinding of the cereal for the Farming of Aloers was blighted with the implementation of the Manorialism since the mid 11th century. Soon after, the new lords of the castles made the grinding of the cereal a monopoly which forced their vassals to grind in their mills in exchange of giving some part of the grinding.

The ownership and explitations of those mills was assigned by the lords to second parties in exchange of an annual payment of the rent. And for this same reason, since the Late Middle Age, we certify that the title of the two mills which can be visited today belong to the houses and farms Solà and Pujol, houses that also appeared between the 13th and 14th centuries.

The country houses Solà and Pujol

The ownership and explitations of those mills was asssigned by the lords to second parties in exchange of an annual payment of the rent. And for this same reason, since the Late Middle Age, we certify that the title of the two mills which can be visited today belong to the houses and farms Solà and Pujol, houses that also appeared between the 13th and 14th centuries. Both houses made the milling activity a complementary income besides their traditional farming tasks of their lands.

The division of the country houses

Along the 14th century there was the division of the inherited Solà with a second house headed by a cabaler (a catalan right used in the 14th century referring to the sons who were not heirs). It was a common process in that time coming from the necessity of fitting the second-born son. This fact explains why along the 15th century there were documents always showing two house heads having the same surname Solà. Since 1502, it is documented the arrival of the surname Miró in this second house of the Solà’s, reason why, from then on, the house will be known as the house of Miró (currently Riuet).

The fragmentation experienced by the house Solà at the dawn of the 16th century with the division of its inheritance between the mother house and the now house of the Miró’s had its consequences in the mill: we can find the shared ownership of their millstones by the Solà’s and the Miró’s. From the two millstones that there were in the current mill of Cal Guirre (the mill of the Solà’s) one would be the millstone of the house of the Solà’s and the other of the Miró’s.